Events Archive

Past events

Friday, November 22, 2019 - 12:15pm to 1:30pm

Moos 2-530, 515 Delaware St SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 | East Bank Campus

Washington Ave Parking Ramp is the closest parking option. If using the lightrail, get off at the East Bank Station

Headshot of Thaddeus PopeEach year, 44,000 Minnesotans die. Nearly one-fourth die from cancer. Many of these patients want to control the timing and manner of their death. Today, terminally ill patients have several “exit options” in Minnesota. But they generally do not have access to medical aid in dying (MAID). This may be changing. Across the country, access to MAID has been in a rapid state of flux. Ten years ago, MAID was available in only two U.S. jurisdictions. Today, it is available in ten. This presentation reviews the history, status, and prevalence of MAID in the United States. It also summarizes ten new points of ethical debate over whether traditional eligibility requirements and safeguards are too permissive or too restrictive.
 
You can find a recording of this talk here

Speaker: Thaddeus Pope, JD, PhD, Director, Health Law Institute, Mitchell - Hamline School of Law; Affiliate Faculty Member, Center for Bioethics, University of Minnesota. Learn more about Professor Pope here.

Image with the words: Center for Bioethics, University of Minnesota Ethics Grand Rounds with a black icon three people and a healthcare plus sign above them
Friday, October 11, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:15pm

Moos 2-530 | East Bank Campus | 515 Delaware St SE

 
When delivery of an extremely premature baby is anticipated at 22 to 24 weeks of gestation, the standard of care is for a specialist in Neonatology to consult with families to determine family-centered goals of care to best determine whether to provide intensive resuscitation or comfort measures only for the baby at time of birth.  Research demonstrates highly variable apporaches to counseling practices across institutions.  This talk will highlight existing knowledge regarding shared decision-making in this setting.  Further, it will describe a qualitative study aimed at understanding the mechanics and substance of these consultations in order to develop more effective strategies for individualized and family-centered decision-making. 

Speaker: Chris Collura, MD, MA, Neonatology, Pediatric Palliative Care, Bioethics, Mayo Clinic Children’s Center

The Center for Bioethics' Ethics Grand Rounds feature noted local, national, and international bioethics scholars who lecture on a wide variety of ethical issues in health care and the life sciences. The lectures are held monthly over the noon hour during the academic year on the East Bank campus of the Unversity of Minnesota. Lectures are free and open to the public. RSVP here

Headshot of Deb DeBruin, PhD
Wednesday, September 25, 2019 - 6:30pm to 8:00pm

Moos Tower 1-450 | East Bank Campus | 515 Delaware St SE Minneapolis, MN 55455

This is the third session of the Center for Bioethics' Mini Bioethics Academy, designed for people to learn about and foster discussion on bioethical challenges in today's society. Mini Bioethics Academy is open to anyone interested in learning more about bioethics.
 
Infectious disease epidemics, natural disasters and terrorist attacks can overwhelm existing public health and healthcare systems. These crises raise a complicated array of ethical issues, from rationing scarce resources to protecting vulnerable community members to providing appropriate supports to health professionals. As part of a national effort, health departments and health care organizations are tasked with developing plans to enable them to respond appropriately to these types of crises. A critical part of that planning effort is the development of guidance for managing the ethical challenges that arise in these emergencies. This presentation will provide background on public health crisis planning, describe the need for ethics guidance, discuss the fundamental ethical values that should guide crisis planning and response; and identify some ways to implement ethical guidance in the challenging context of mass casualty incidents.

Talk by Debra DeBruin, PhD

Register here | Seating is limited; advanced registration is encouraged. 

Price: Adults/General Public:  Advance registration: $10/session or $25/3 sessions | Same day registration: $15/session at door if space is available

Discounts: Student rate with valid student ID: $5/session or $10/3 sessions

Headshot of Ed Ratner, MD
Wednesday, September 18, 2019 - 6:30pm to 8:00pm

Moos Tower 1-450 | East Bank Campus | 515 Delaware St SE Minneapolis, MN 55455

This is the second session of the Center for Bioethics' Mini Bioethics Academy, designed for people to learn about and foster discussion on bioethical challenges in today's society. Mini Bioethics Academy is open to anyone interested in learning more about bioethics.
 
Discussions of bioethics typically focus on care in the hospital, while ethical conflicts occur in all settings.  For families and community-based organizations, there are frequent ethical conflicts in home-based health care.  These include: whether a frail or disabled person can return or remain at home, whether driving or other activities should be permitted and who is responsible for providing needed care.  This presentation will offer some basic principles and approaches to ethical issues in home care.  Those attending will be asked to discuss a number of actual cases. This seminar should be useful to families providing elder care and health care professionals in all settings.

Talk by Edward Ratner, MD

Register here | Seating is limited; advanced registration is encouraged. 

Price: Adults/General Public:  Advance registration: $10/session or $25/3 sessions | Same day registration: $15/session at door if space is available

Discounts: Student rate with valid student ID: $5/session or $10/3 sessions

Image with the words: Center for Bioethics, University of Minnesota Ethics Grand Rounds with a black icon of the vitruvian man
Tuesday, September 17, 2019 - 12:15pm to 1:30pm
Headshot of Amos Laar, PhDJoin researcher, ethicist, and public health advocate Amos Laar, PhD as he connects the dots between HIV and the social, cultural, ethical and human rights issues systemically integrated with the disease in Ghana. Laar is a native of Ghana and a Senior Lecturer of the University of Ghana with academic training in Nutrition, Public Health as well as an MA in Bioethics from the University of Minnesota. For his MA, Laar's completed a masters' thesis in 2014 on ethically appropriate responses to HIV in Ghana. Laar was recently featured in the Lancet's Diabetes and Endocrinology journal for his nutrition work on regulating unhealthy foods in Ghana. This talk will bring a social public health perspective to Ghana’s national response to HIV with a focus on how these variables contribute to HIV transmission as well as disease and implementation outcomes. This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Global Health and Social Responsibility and the School of Public Health
 
A recording of this talk can be found here. 
 
The Center for Bioethics' Ethics Grand Rounds feature noted local, national, and international bioethics scholars who lecture on a wide variety of ethical issues in health care and the life sciences. The lectures are held monthly during the academic year over the lunch hour on the East Bank campus of the University of Minnesota. Seminars are free and open to the public. No need to RSVP. 
 
 
Photo of Bonnie LeRoy, MS, CGC holding a tablet and smiling
Wednesday, September 11, 2019 - 6:30pm to 8:00pm

Moos Tower 1-450 | East Bank Campus | 515 Delaware St SE Minneapolis, MN 55455

This is the first session of the Center for Bioethics' Mini Bioethics Academy, designed for people to learn about and foster discussion on bioethical challenges in today's society. Mini Bioethics Academy is open to anyone interested in learning more about bioethics.
 
What can genetic testing tell us? Do we learn different information from clinical testing vs. direct to consumer testing? Do we know what happens to our information? What are the risks and benefits?  Not all genetic testing is the same and not everyone can benefit.  There are risks associated with genetic testing and there are benefits but informed consent remains a challenge. Moreover, our underlying beliefs about what our genes are and what genetic information can tell us, further complicates testing.  In this presentation, we will discuss different types of testing, the challenges with consent for testing, and who benefits from testing.

Talk by: Bonnie LeRoy, MS, CGC

Register here | Seating is limited; advanced registration is encouraged. 

Price: Adults/General Public:  Advance registration: $10/session or $25/3 sessions | Same day registration: $15/session at door if space is available

Discounts: Student rate with valid student ID: $5/session or $10/3 sessions

MBA Header
This is the third session of the Center for Bioethics' Mini Bioethics Academy, designed for people to learn about and foster discussion on bioethical challenges in today's society. Mini Bioethics Academy is open to anyone interested in learning more about bioethics.
Wednesday, May 8, 2019 - 6:30pm to 8:00pm
2-690 Moos Tower
515 Delaware St SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455

Session Description: We are in the midst of the worst measles epidemic since it was declared to be eradicated in 2000.  There is greater vaccine hesitancy and refusal among parents, namely due to a perception that the risk of vaccine preventable diseases is low and that there are significant risks associated with vaccines.  Despite data to support the safety and efficacy of vaccines, there remains a small but vocal community of activists opposed to mandatory childhood vaccination. Dr. Jennifer Needle will address how these misperceptions came to be, the impact they are having on public health today, and address two key ethical questions: 1) do parents have a moral duty to vaccinate their children and 2) what is the appropriate response from the medical community regarding parents who refuse to vaccinate their children?

Talk by Jennifer Needle, MD, MPH

Register here: https://www.tickets.umn.edu/UMATO/Online/article/BioethicsMBA2019

Individual Sessions:
Adults/General Public: $10 Advance / $15 at Door
Students: $5
Online registration ends at 4:30 pm the night before. Walk-in registration begins 6 pm the day of the event.

Seating is limited; advanced registration is encouraged. 

MBA Header
This is the second session of the Center for Bioethics' Mini Bioethics Academy, designed for people to learn about and foster discussion on bioethical challenges in today's society. Mini Bioethics Academy is open to anyone interested in learning more about bioethics.
Wednesday, May 1, 2019 - 6:30pm to 8:00pm
2-690 Moos Tower
515 Delaware St SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455

Session Description: Health researchers have studied “stem cell tourism” to clinics in countries such as China, India, Mexico, Thailand, and the Ukraine but more recently, studies have found hundreds of clinics here in the U.S. selling unapproved and unproven stem cell interventions. Many of these clinics do not sell FDA-approved stem cell products or have credible  evidence supporting their marketing claims.  This direct-to-consumer approach to selling unproven and unlicensed cell-based products prompts troubling concerns about patient safety, the manipulation of hope in advertising, and the gap between the current state of stem cell research and the purported therapies these clinics market.

In this talk, Leigh Turner, PhD, will describe the U.S. direct-to-consumer marketplace for stem cell interventions and explore ethical issues related to the increase in U.S. clinics selling stem cell treatments. The presentation will also cover regulation of stem cell-based products, FDA enforcement activity, and lawsuits filed by former patients of U.S. stem cell clinics. 

Register here: https://www.tickets.umn.edu/UMATO/Online/article/BioethicsMBA2019

Individual Sessions:
Adults/General Public: $10 Advance / $15 at Door
Students: $5
Online registration ends at 4:30 pm the night before. Walk-in registration begins 6 pm the day of the event.

Seating is limited; advanced registration is encouraged.

MBA Header
This is the first session of the Center for Bioethics' Mini Bioethics Academy, designed for people to learn about and foster discussion on bioethical challenges in today's society. Mini Bioethics Academy is open to anyone interested in learning more about bioethics.
Wednesday, April 24, 2019 - 6:30pm to 8:00pm
2-690 Moos Tower
515 Delaware St SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455

Session Description: We know that what impacts health lies largely outside of normal healthcare delivery. We call these the negative social determinants of health. One in six people with low incomes need legal help to overcome these determinants and improve their health. Restoring food stamps when wrongfully denied to a diabetic can eliminate the need for a kidney transplant. Demanding that a landlord remove mold from substandard housing can reduce the need for emergency asthma care. Such interventions can also reduce overall healthcare costs. Healthcare Legal Partnerships exist to meet needs like these by adding lawyers to the healthcare team in various settings. The University of Minnesota helped pioneer this model of care in the 1990s. The HLP Collaborative in Minnesota was founded by nursing educator Dr. Eileen Weber, who is also an attorney, so HLPs in our region can share best practices and increase awareness, education and outreach of this effective interprofessional care model. Her presentation will offer HLP strategies and resources to help those who work to advance health equity.

Upper Midwest Healthcare Legal Partnership Learning Collaborative Report

Register here: https://www.tickets.umn.edu/UMATO/Online/article/BioethicsMBA2019

Individual Sessions: 
Adults/General Public: $10 Advance / $15 at Door
Students: $5 
Online registration ends at 4:30 pm the night before. Walk-in registration begins 6 pm the day of the event.

Seating is limited; advanced registration is encouraged.

Ethics Grand Rounds header with fuzzy background
Friday, April 19, 2019 - 12:15pm to 1:30pm

Moos Tower 2-520 515 Delaware Street SE Minneapolis, MN 55455

Speaker: Jennifer Needle, MD, MPH | Assistant Professor, Center for Bioethics, University of Minnesota

This event occurred on Friday April 19 as part of the Ethics Grand Rounds series. You can find the recording of this event here.

Advance care planning supports patient-centered decision-making by discussing goals, values, and preferences for future medical care.  This process involves three key stakeholders: the patient, their surrogate decision-maker, and their clinicians. How do the stakeholder roles change when the patient is an adolescent who has the capacity but not the legal right to make medical decisions?  Dr. Jennifer Needle, a Pediatric Intensive Care physician from the University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital and faculty member in the Center for Bioethics, will address this question from the perspectives of these stakeholders in the context of adolescent advance care planning. She will review the literature on the benefits and barriers to effective advance care planning, discuss clinician, patient, and surrogate perspectives on medical decision-making in adolescent patients, and discuss future areas of research to support adolescent patients and their families in making informed medical decisions.

This event is co-sponsored by the Department of Pediatrics in the University of Minnesota's Medical School.

No reservation required. Questions? Contact the coordinator at: jaco0947@umn.edu

 

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